Taste Translation

Delicious Japanese to English translation for sake, wine, tea, coffee and chocolate

Author

Arline Lyons

Chicago coffee tasting at MAME

Mathieu and Emi held a special tasting session at MAME on Sunday 9 April to share some coffees that Mathieu had brought back from a trip to the US, specifically to Chicago. A friend insisted that he visit famous roasters… Continue reading →

WSET Level 3 Award in Sake Review

Why a sake course?  Although I had known about sake for years, I developed a keener interest when a Japanese viniculture student whose academic work I had translated starting promoting his national drink – sake. His marketing material for breweries… Continue reading →

Photo gallery: Prufrock Coffee, London

Photo gallery: WSET Level 3 Sake Course Day 3, Japan Centre and Shimogamo

Photo gallery: Gozenshu sake tasting at Sakagura with Tengu Sake

Photo gallery: WSET Level 3 Sake Course Day 2

Photo gallery: WSET Level 3 Sake Course Day 1

Sake tasting at Shinwazen, March 2017

The very generous Markus Baumgartner is one half of the couple who run the charming Japanese food, drink and gift shop Shinwazen near Zürich Hauptbahnhof. He and his wife Yuko are retired, but active in the Slow Food movement and… Continue reading →

Sake rice

As it’s also called “rice wine”, it’s not hard to guess that sake is made from rice. But what kind of rice? Rice grown in Japan is usually short-grained Japonica rice, both glutinous (e.g. mochi rice) and non-glutinous (table rice) varieties. It’s entirely… Continue reading →

What is sake?

Made from a simple set of raw ingredients, sake gains depth and complexity through the preparation of rice, choice of brewing yeast, and variations in the the brewing process. The term sake (酒) in Japanese has a much wider meaning than in English,… Continue reading →

What is the Taste Translation logo?

The concentric circles that make up the Taste Translation logo are based on those found inside official sake tasting cups, kiki-choko (ききちょこ). The pattern is called ja-no-me (蛇の目), “snake eyes”. Professional sake tasters look through the sake at the alternating white and… Continue reading →

Who’s behind Taste Translation?

Taste Translation offers specialised Japanese to English translation for fine food and drink, in particular for sake, wine, tea, coffee and chocolate. My name is Arline Lyons, and I’m a translator and localisation project manager with 20 years’ experience of Japanese language and culture…. Continue reading →

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